Dogs and Long Grass

Dogs, Pets, Summer Pets

Those pesky grass seeds

Most vets have dealt with a grass seed lodged in one (or more) dog orifices! While these seeds seem quite benign, they present a real risk to your dog. Leaving seeds embedded in the skin after a romp in long grass (which is oh-so-easy to do as they’re really hard to spot!) means they can penetrate and enter your doggie’s system. Once inside, the only way out is by removal as they don’t break down. Left inside, their effects can be disastrous, ranging from irritation to infection to paralysis.

What to do if you suspect your dog has a grass seed stuck somewhere

See your vet quickly. The earlier they intervene, the easier it is to remove them and often, it’s less expensive. Some body parts – such as the ear canal – do require more invasive procedures. If your best mate has one there, they’ll likely need a general anaesthetic and extensive antibiotic treatment.

How to avoid grass seed lodgements

The best option – avoid long grass! If that’s not possible, a thorough check after playtime is vital. Eyes, ears, paws, legs, abdomen, bum … you get it!

In addition, keep on top of your pet’s grooming. If you have a long haired friend, keep their coat short during spring and summer, particularly near their paws. This reduces the chances of seeds getting caught in their long tresses … plus makes check-time easier for you!

Here’s what to look out for when it comes to grass seeds, your dog and their body parts:

Where

  • Skin
  • Paws
  • Ears
  • Eyes
  • Nose
  • Provate parts
  • Any exposed skin
  • Mouth & throat

Symptoms

  • Persistent licking or sneezing
  • Redness
  • Swelling
  • Limping
  • Loud yelp if you touch their ear
  • Shaking/scratching/tilting head
  • Rubbing or keeping eye/s closed, or weeping eyes
  • Coughing/retching/gagging
  • Difficulty/pain when urinating
  • Blood in urine or nostrils
  • Difficulties or noisy breathing
  • Hind limb instability

 

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